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Disease Name: Polio


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Please review the Idaho Reportable Disease Rules (IDAPA 16.02.10) for the most up-to-date information.


Overview / Case Definition

Polio is a disease caused by a virus that affects the nervous system and is mainly spread by person-to-person contact. Polio can also be spread by drinking water or other drinks or eating raw or undercooked food that are contaminated with the feces of an infected person.

There are two types of vaccine that protect against polio: inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) and oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). IPV is given as an injection in the leg or arm, depending on the patient's age. Polio vaccine may be given at the same time as other vaccines.

Most people should get polio vaccine when they are children. Children get 4 doses of IPV at these ages: 2 months, 4 months, 6-18 months, and a booster dose at 4-6 years. OPV has not been used in the United States since 2000 but is still used in many parts of the world.


Restrictions

Daycare Facility

A person who is diagnosed with poliomyelitis infection must not attend or work in any occupation in which there is direct contact with children, or attend a daycare facility, as long as the disease is in a communicable form.

School

A person diagnosed with poliomyelitis infection must not attend or work in any occupation in which there is direct contact with children, on private, parochial, charter, or public school as long as the disease is in a communicable form.


Reporting

Within 1 working day

Reportable by Healthcare and Labs:

Reportable by Food Service Facility:

Suspect Reportable: Yes

Reporting Timeframe: Within 1 working day



Diagnosis / Testing

Can be detected in specimens from the pharynx and feces, less commonly from urine, and rarely from CSF by isolation in cell culture or reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction.


Treatment


Additional Information


Click to Call South Central Public Health District

Click to Call the Idaho State Epidemiologist

Click to Call Idaho State Communications