1020 Washington St N       Twin Falls ID 83301-3156       (208) 737-5900       Toll Free: (866) 710-9775

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Disease Name: Tuberculosis


Quick Links

Please review the Idaho Reportable Disease Rules (IDAPA 16.02.10) for the most up-to-date information.


Overview / Case Definition

Diagnostic Standards and Classification of Tuberculosis in Adults and Children: http://www.cdc.gov/tb/publications/PDF/1376.pdf

Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by a bacterium called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but TB bacteria can attack any part of the body such as the kidney, spine, and brain. Not everyone infected with TB bacteria becomes sick. As a result, two TB-related conditions exist: latent TB infection (LTBI) and TB disease. If not treated properly, TB disease can be fatal.

Latent TB Infection

TB bacteria can live in the body without making you sick. This is called latent TB infection. In most people who breathe in TB bacteria and become infected, the body is able to fight the bacteria to stop them from growing. People with latent TB infection:

Many people who have latent TB infection never develop TB disease. In these people, the TB bacteria remain inactive for a lifetime without causing disease. But in other people, especially people who have a weak immune system, the bacteria become active, multiply, and cause TB disease.

TB Disease

TB bacteria become active if the immune system can't stop them from growing. When TB bacteria are active (multiplying in your body), this is called TB disease. People with TB disease are sick. They may also be able to spread the bacteria to people they spend time with every day.

Many people who have latent TB infection never develop TB disease. Some people develop TB disease soon after becoming infected (within weeks) before their immune system can fight the TB bacteria.


Restrictions

Daycare Facility

A person with active pulmonary tuberculosis must not attend or work in any occupation in which he has direct contact or provides personal care to children in a daycare facility, until he is determined to be noninfectious by a licensed physician, the Department or Health District.

Health Care Facility

a. A person suspected to have pulmonary tuberculosis in a health care facility must be managed under the “Guideline for Isolation Precautions in Hospitals,” as incorporated in Section 004 of these rules, until the diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis is excluded by a licensed physician.

b. A person with active pulmonary tuberculosis in a health care facility must be managed under the “Guideline for Isolation Precautions in Hospitals,” as incorporated in Section 004 of these rules, until he is determined to be noninfectious by a licensed physician, the infection control committee of the facility, or the Department.

c. A person with active pulmonary tuberculosis must not work in any occupation in which he has direct contact or provides personal care to persons confined to a health care or residential care facility, until he is determined to be noninfectious by a licensed physician, infection control committee of the facility, or the Department.

d. In the event that active pulmonary tuberculosis is diagnosed in an employee, patient, or resident, the health care facility must conduct an investigation to identify contacts. The Department or Health District may assist in the investigation.

School

A person with active pulmonary tuberculosis must not attend or work in any occupation in which he has direct contact with students in a private, parochial, charter, or public school until he is determined to be noninfectious by a licensed physician, the Department, or Health District.

Household Contacts

Any member of a household, in which there is a case of active pulmonary tuberculosis, must not attend or work in any occupation in which he provides direct supervision of students in a school, personal care to children in a daycare facility or persons confined to a health care facility, or works in a food service facility, until he has been determined to be noninfectious by a licensed physician, the Department, or Health District.


Reporting

Within 3 working days

Reportable by Healthcare and Labs:

Reportable by Food Service Facility:

Suspect Reportable:

Reporting Timeframe: Within 3 working days



Diagnosis / Testing

FAQ for Molecular Detection of Drug Resistance to M Tuberculosis complex: http://healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/Portals/0/Health/Labs/FAQs_for_TB_MDDR.pdf

Submission of samples to the Idaho Bureau of Laboratories (IBL) for Nucleic Acid Amplification testing: http://healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/Portals/0/Health/Labs/SSG/Clinical_TB_NAAT.pdf

M. tuberculosis culture confirmation: http://healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/Portals/0/Health/Labs/SSG/Clinical_TB_Culture_Confirmation.pdf


Treatment

TB Clinic

SCPHD conducts a TB clinic, utilizing a local pulmonologist, at the Twin Falls office.  Patients are seen by appointment only.  Call Tanis Maxwell at 737-5971 for more information.

Treatment

Consultation

The Curry International Tuberculosis Center operates a Warmline consultation service.  This service provides clinical TB consultation, pediatric case consultation and TB prevention recommendations to clinicians free of charge.  This service is available 9am to 3pm (Pacific time), Monday through Friday.  Voicemail for recording messages is available 24 hours a day, 7 days per week.  Call 877-390-6682 to reach the Curry Center.


Additional Information


Click to Call South Central Public Health District

Click to Call the Idaho State Epidemiologist

Click to Call Idaho State Communications